Yogurt Pot Cake

In what seems like my never-ending quest to own every shape of baking dish possible, I got a little closer to that goal after reading about this cake. It was necessary to buy a savarin mould to make it. Was it worth the expense?

Let’s see what happens.

Get some eggs.

Start with the eggs.

Start with the eggs.

Separate them into whites…

Egg whites.

Egg whites.

…and yolks.

Egg yolks.

Egg yolks.

Beat the egg whiles until they hold firm peaks.

Whisked until there are firm peaks.

Whisked until there are firm peaks.

Add the yogurt to the egg yolks.

Egg yolks and yogurt.

Egg yolks and yogurt.

Then add the sugar.

Adding the sugar (a whatfoodimade action shot™).

Adding the sugar (a whatfoodimade action shot™).

And whisk until light and airy.

Sugar added and whisked into a light and airy mixture.

Sugar added and whisked into a light and airy mixture.

Next, add the oil.

Add the oil while mixing.

Add the oil while mixing.

Now add the vanilla…

Vanilla and lemon zest are added.

Vanilla and lemon zest are added.

…and the lemon zest.

Lemon zest.

Lemon zest.

Add the flour and cornstarch.

Flour and cornstarch into the mix.

Flour and cornstarch into the mix.

Flour and cornstarch are added and mixed together.

Flour and cornstarch are added and mixed together.

Fold in the egg whites.

Fold in the egg whites.

Fold in the egg whites.

Loading up my new savarin mould.

Ready to be baked.

Ready to be baked.

Add a sprinkling of icing sugar.

Out of the oven, dusted with icing sugar

Out of the oven, dusted with icing sugar

Yogurt Pot Cake.

Yogurt Pot Cake.

Yogurt Pot Cake.

Interior view.

Interior of Yogurt Pot Cake.

Interior of Yogurt Pot Cake.

Thick slices of yogurt pot cake.

Thick slices of cake.

Thick slices of cake.

Very good, and worth buying a savarin mould for.

The recipe is here: http://www.smoothfm.com.au/article/nigellissima
Below, a North American-ized version, including a bit of the introduction from the book Nigellissima to help explain the directions (you do not have to buy a yogurt pot to make this cake).

… your yogurt carton is your unit of measurement. And even though I saw from the original recipe that I copied down from some scrawled piece of paper in the kitchen of a house I’d rented one summer) that the specified yogurt carton had a 4-ounce capacity, I have kept the same number of eggs for my 6-ounce yogurt carton. I work on the principle that eggs these days are larger than when the cake first came into being. Anyway, it works, and that’s the main thing. And this is the way it works: for 1 cake, you need 1 carton of yogurt, 2 cartons of sugar, 1 carton of oil, 1 carton of cornstarch, and 2 cartons of flour. In keeping with this style of measuring, you will see that I have even stipulated 2 capfuls of vanilla extract.

Yogurt Pot Cake
Cuts into 16 slices, but it would be easy to eat 3 or 4 at a sitting.

Ingredients

2/3 cup plain whole-milk yogurt
2/3 cup flavourless vegetable oil (plus some for greasing)
3 eggs
1-1/4 cup superfine sugar
1-1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Zest of 1/2 unwaxed lemon
1-1/3 cup all-purpose flour
2/3 cup cornstarch
1 tsp icing sugar, to serve
You will need: 1 x 9″ (and approximately 2-inch-deep) savarin mould or plain tube pan

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350° F and grease your savarin mould. You can use vegetable oil for this or a baking spray.

Separate the eggs and put the whites into one bowl and the yolks in another. Whisk the whites until you have firm peaks, then set aside while you get on with the rest of the cake.

Scrape the yogurt out of its pot and onto the egg yolks, then use the emptied yogurt pot to measure out the other ingredients – so, next, add two pots (just) of sugar and whisk with the egg yolks and yogurt until light and airy.

Now fill up your yogurt pot with vegetable oil and, beating all the while, slowly add this to the egg yolk mixture. Then beat in the vanilla and lemon zest.

Still beating, add two yogurt potfuls of flour, followed by one potful of cornstarch, then scrape down and fold in with a rubber spatula. Now, with a large metal spoon, dollop in the whisked egg whites, and fold them in with the spatula.

Fill the prepared savarin mould with the smooth, soft batter—it will come right to the top—and bake in the oven for 30-35 minutes. When cooked, the sides will be coming away at the edges and a cake tester will come out clean.

Remove it from the oven to a wire rack, letting the cake sit in the tin for 10 minutes before turning out.

Once cooled, transfer to a serving plate or stand and dust with icing sugar. Traditionally, this cake would be placed on the plate with the smooth side uppermost, but I rather like it turned back up the way it was baked, with it’s rustic cracks and uneven surface visible.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s